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ruby dsl tricks: reifying references

Ruby is great for writing DSLs because it has first class support for two of the most important ingredients of DSLs, contexts and code blocks. With the proper use of instance_eval the same block of code can be evaluated in various contexts to have different kinds of effects but most often what we want to do is evaluate the code block in the “freest” possible context to create an AST (abstract syntax tree). I’m almost certain there is a connection here with initial and terminal algebras in category theory but someone smarter than me will have to chase that analogy. Today I’m just going to demonstrate how to reify references so that we can support cyclic structures in our DSL. Continue reading

stuff for 2017

Be kinder to your fellow human beings. If you’re a nerd then like Joscha Bach you probably have an extra degree of freedom when it comes to normative belief systems and the signals regular people use to gauge how good/bad they are is probably lost on you. I know it is lost on me because the hyper-parameters in my neural nets are configured slightly differently. My empathy networks are more subdued than the average. Fortunately if you’re not a psychopath there is plenty of time to re-adjust those parameters.

Godspeed friends.

P.S.: I’m an atheist. I just think “godpseed” sounds cool.

war story: caching

There was that one time I used strace and a Ruby script to bypass a really long step in a build pipeline. The trick was figuring out the inputs and outputs by running the process under strace and utilizing the output from strace to compute some hashes. The core of the script was a utility class and some convenience methods for computing hashes by shelling out to find, tar, and shasum Continue reading

finger exercises: pipes, bytes, and fibers

In which I try to figure out how to pack and unpack bytes over an in-process pipe so that I can use it in some future message framing protocol for a worker pool. There will be a guest appearance by Fiber to simplify the parsing of messages in a non-blocking manner. Continue reading

cloud patterns: baking VMs with Packer

When managing a cloud infrastructure there are foundational components that pretty much all your VMs will need. For those foundational components instead of installing them at run time as the VM is starting you should use Packer to just put them into a VM image once. This is a good practice in general because if done right it will reduce startup time and lead to a more efficient and consistent fleet for your cloud infrastructure. Continue reading

software hygiene: encrypt your secrets

Most of my projects have a Rakefile because common tasks should be expressed in code instead of english and Rake is a great way to codify those common tasks. One thing that I have seen developers do is check-in secret tokens into their repositories in plaintext. I have done this as well. It is the simplest thing to do but it is terrible practice so to atone for my past sins and get others to not check-in secret tokens here is some code I now use to handle secret tokens. Adapt to your own workflow accordingly. Continue reading